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Thursday, 25 April 2013 09:35

From the archives of Liberal’s hometown newspaper since 1886.
Researched and compiled by A.J. Coleman, L&T Reporter 
1963

Schools, churches build and grow

The 1962-63 school year was nearly over, but the USD No. 480 school board was thinking about the future and considering the building of a brand-new junior high school. The board was trying to decide on the best design for the new modern building. They had finally decided on a hexagonal building made of five hexagons that would have a large physical education pod in the middle. The radical style buildings were a new and interesting concept to the people of Liberal, who did not want to be left behind in the era of modern architecture.
Nowadays, many people receive state government aid and seniors who are headed to college know that applying for scholarships is a necessary step. Back in 1963, it was an unusual thing to be able to apply to the state government for money — especially for high school seniors. 
Liberal High School seniors were allowed to apply for state scholarships under a new state program established by the 1963 Kansas legislature. The legislators made provision for awarding 200 scholarships to high school seniors on the basis of ability and need. “Each scholarship will cover fees and tuition to one Kansas accredited school of the recipient’s choice with a maximum of $500 per scholarship,” the newspaper article explained. The scholarship could be renewed every year. 
The quality of public education is still a major issue for Americans who mostly educate their children in public schools. Fifty years ago, many towns still supported church-based schools and in one town in Missouri, the issue of who should educate children was growing red hot. Roman Catholic parents were taking their kids out of parochial schools and enrolling them in public schools. The move started suddenly and without any warning. In one community, three quarters of the state’s parochial students moved out of their school and into a 150-student seven room school. This was just one example of the movement of students from parochial schools to public schools.
Normally when a car is involved in an accident, it does the hitting. However, in one case that made the front page of the Times, the boy who was injured ran into the car. Stanley Schneider, 8, of 105 West Hoover, sustained a head injury after colliding with a vehicle. Witnesses said that the boy dashed right into the side of a passing car. The boy was thought to have sustained a concussion and was hospitalized. He collided with the outside rearview mirror. The boy was lucky to only sustain a concussion from the collision, doctors said. 
“Emmanuel Baptist Buys 1.87 acres at 17th and Western,” read the headline of the Southwest Daily Times. The long-time church was planning on a big move from the current location at 530 North Pershing. Emmanuel Baptist Church began as a mission of First Southern Baptist Church of Liberal in July 1960 and was organized as a church in December of 1961. Five decades later, the once-fledgling church still operates on the same piece of property.

 

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The High Plains Daily Leader and Southwest Daily Times are published Sunday through Friday and reaches homes throughout the Liberal, Kansas retail trade zone. The Leader & Times is the official newspaper of Seward County, USD No. 480, USD No. 483 and the cities of Liberal and Kismet.  The Leader & Times is a member of the Liberal Chamber of Commerce, the Kansas Press Association, the National Newspaper Association and the Associated Press.

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